SafeThings 2022

IEEE Workshop on the Internet of Safe Things

Co-located with Oakland 2022 »

May 26th, 2022

The Internet of Things has become increasingly popular and innovative. With the rise of connected devices, we have an opportunity to significantly improve the safety of legacy systems. For instance, insights from data across systems can be exploited to reduce accidents, improve air quality and support disaster events. IoT-based cyber-physical systems (CPS) also bring new risks that arise due to the unexpected interaction between systems and the larger number of attack vectors on these systems. These safety risks can arise in the context of use of medical devices, smart home appliance control, autonomous vehicle and intelligent transportation designs, or conflicts in policy execution at a societal scale.

The Workshop on the Internet of Safe Things seeks to bring together researchers to create solutions for the development of safe cyber-physical systems. As safety is inherently linked with the security and privacy of a system, we also seek contributions in these areas that address safety concerns. We seek to develop a community that systematically dissects the vulnerabilities and risks exposed by these emerging CPSs, and creates tools, algorithms, frameworks, and systems that help in the development of safe systems.

We seek contributions across domains - autonomous vehicles, smart homes, medical devices, smart grid, intelligent transportation; and across disciplines - systems, control, human-computer interaction, privacy, security, reliability, machine learning, and verification.


Important Dates


Paper Submission Deadline January 28th February 4th, 2022 (AoE, UTC-12)
Acceptance Notification February 21th February 28th, 2022
Camera-ready Submission Deadline March 5th March 12th, 2022 (AoE, UTC-12)
Workshop May 26th, 2022

Call for Papers

As the traditionally segregated systems are brought online for next-generation connected applications, we have an opportunity to significantly improve the safety of legacy systems. For instance, insights from data across systems can be exploited to reduce accidents, improve air quality and support disaster events. Cyber-physical systems (CPS) also bring new risks that arise due to the unexpected interaction between systems and the environment. These safety risks arise because of information that distracts users while driving, software errors in medical devices, corner cases in data-driven control, compromised sensors in drones or conflicts in societal policies. Accordingly, the Workshop on the Internet of Safe Things (or SafeThings, for brevity) seeks to bring researchers and practitioners that are actively exploring system design, modeling, verification, authentication approaches to provide safety guarantees in the Internet of Things (IoT). The workshop welcomes contributions that integrate hardware and software systems provided by disparate vendors, particularly those that have humans in the loop. As safety is inherently linked with security and privacy, we also seek contributions in these areas that address safety concerns. With the SafeThings workshop, we seek to develop a community that systematically dissects the vulnerabilities and risks exposed by these emerging CPSes, and create tools, algorithms, frameworks, and systems that help in the development of safe systems.

The scope of SafeThings includes safety topics as it relates to an individual’s health (physical, mental), society (air pollution, toxicity, disaster events), or the environment (species preservation, global warming, oil spills). The workshop considers safety from a human perspective, and thus, does not include topics such as thread safety or memory safety in its scope.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following categories:

In addition, application domains of interest include, but are not limited to autonomous vehicles and transportation infrastructure; medical CPS and public health; smart buildings, smart grid and smart cities.

The PC will select a best paper award for work that distinguishes itself in moving the security and privacy of IoT/CPS forward through novel attacks or defenses.

Call for Demos

In addition to presentation of accepted papers, SafeThings will include a demo session that is designed to allow researchers to share demonstrations of their systems that include CPS/IoT security and safety as a major design goal. Demos of attacks are also welcome.


Submission Instruction

Submitted papers must be in English, unpublished, and must not be currently under review for any other publication. Submissions must follow the official IEEE Conference Proceedings format. Full papers must be at most 6 single-spaced, double column 8.5” x 11” pages excluding references. Demos must be at most 1 single-spaced, double column 8.5” x 11” page, and have "Demo:" in their titles. All figures must fit within these limits. Authors are encouraged to use the IEEE conference proceedings templates. LaTeX submissions should use IEEEtran.cls version 1.8b. Papers that do not meet the size and formatting requirements will not be reviewed. All papers must be in Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) and submitted through the web submission form via HotCRP (submission link below). The review process is double-blind.

Full Papers: 6 pages excluding references.
Demos: 1 page (with "Demo:" in the title).

Submission Form »


Organization


General Chairs

Danny Yuxing Huang (New York University, USA)

Soteris Demetriou (Imperial College London, UK)


Program Committee Chairs

Sandeep K. Shukla (Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India)

Dave (Jing) Tian (Purdue University, USA)


Web Chair

Luyi Xing (Indiana University Bloomington, USA)


Technical Program Committee

Fatima Anwar (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA)

Antonio Bianchi (Purdue University, USA)

Berkay Celik (Purdue University, USA)

Rahul Chatterjee (University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA)

Kai Chen (Chinese Academy of Science, China)

Qi Alfred Chen (University of California, Irvine, USA)

Pardis Emami-Naeini (University of Washington, USA)

Maria Gorlatova (Duke University, USA)

Hamed Haddadi (Imperial College London, UK)

Xiali (Sharon) Hei (University of Louisiana, Lafayette, USA)

Grant Hernandez (Qualcomm, USA)

Erisa Karafili (University of Southampton, UK)

Chung Hwan Kim (University of Texas at Dallas, USA)

Kyungtae Kim (Purdue University, USA)

Taegyu Kim (Purdue University and Pennsylvania State University, USA)

Vireshwar Kumar (Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi, India)

Zhiqiang Lin (Ohio State University, USA)

Eleonora Losiouk (University of Padova, Italy)

Aravind Machiry (Purdue University, USA)

Carsten Maple (University of Warwick, UK)

Patrick McDaniel (Pennsylvania State University, USA)

Hui Peng (Baidu Security, USA)

Atul Prakash (University of Michigan, USA)

Amir Rahmati (Stony Brook University, USA)

Aanjhan Ranganathan (Northeastern University, USA)

Kasper Rasmussen (University of Oxford, UK)

Weisong Shi (Wayne State University, USA)

Yixin Sun (University of Virginia, USA)

Nils Ole Tippenhauer (CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security, Germany)

Santiago Torres-Arias (Purdue University, USA)

Güliz Seray Tuncay (Google, USA)

Ben Ujcich (Georgetown University, USA)

André Weimerskirch (Lear, USA)

Luyi Xing (Indiana University, Bloomington, USA)

Ziming Zhao (University at Buffalo, USA)

Saman Zonouz (Rutgers University, USA)


We are keep adding new TPC members. If you would like to be considered for the TPC please contact any of the organisers.